Arborist Updates

November 19, 2020Bailey Springs tree planting

This week we had a great tree planting event at Bailey Springs. Almost 50 volunteers helped plant over 45 trees along sidewalks and park areas adjacent to an affordable housing section of the neighborhood. Our town's partnership with TreesDavidson pulled off yet another awesome tree planting day! Special thanks to the public works staff for digging holes and pouring the sidewalk ahead of time and also to Charlene Minor with Davidson Parks & Recreation for all her help!

October 29, 2020Fisher Farm tree planting

This week we partnered with Trees Davidson to plant over 45 new trees at Fisher Farm Park! I counted over 65 volunteers, including many Scouts and local residents. The trees are just gorgeous specimens from a North Carolina nursery, with a variety of native species including white oak, beech, tulip poplar and tupelo. Many thanks to Davidson Public Works staff who dug the holes perfectly (not too deep) and helped unload the tree delivery truck! Our Parks & Recreation staff (Charlene Minor) ensured we followed health safety protocol. Trees Davidson and our town tree board were instrumental in coordinating this effort. We are fortunate to have such excellent town staff, involved residents, and a truly awesome partner in Trees Davidson. Great job all around!

October 22, 2020

This week I was called out to a property on Thompson Street for a tree removal permit request. The large oak tree in question was planted over 75 years ago by a family member and was dropping large dead branch during storms. Upon inspection, the tree did not warrant removal, but it definitely requires some pruning of large dead branches evident in the tree’s crown. Deep root fertilizing was also suggested to improve health. The resident was quite happy that the tree can stay and will be contacting a local certified arborist to provide tree care. Another tree saved!

More about tree pruning here: https://extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/fnr/fnr-506-w.pdf

September 30, 2020

This week I was called out for a building permit on Pinecrest Street. The property has a number of large trees and a lot of tall bamboo! Bamboo can be invasive, and the plan here is to remove as much as we can while saving trees and building a nice home. Happily, we were able to meet with the builder and homeowner and identified eleven good size trees to preserve. This includes five mature oak trees between 20”-27” diameter!  You can learn more about bamboo in NC here: https://weeds.ces.ncsu.edu/2019/03/thinking-about-growing-bamboo-proceed-with-caution/

September 9, 2020Fungi on willow oak

This week I was called to look at a big willow oak tree we figure is close to 100 years old. Generally the tree appears healthy, but one note of concern is at the base where we saw some fungal fruiting bodies. This decay fungus appears to be Inonotus dryadeus and is one of the “butt rot” fungus pathogens that we need to take seriously. While it doesn’t mean the tree is done for, it does mean the tree will need ongoing monitoring and care for the remainder of its life. Most older trees can live for many years with diseases, and consulting with an ISA Certified Arborist is a good first step towards improving a trees longevity.  Learn more about this fungus here: https://www.mushroomexpert.com/inonotus_dryadeus.html

September 2, 2020Pine Road trees

This week I was called out to Pine Road to look at trees for a new home building permit. We could clearly see how the street got it’s name, as some pine trees were 100 feet tall on the heavily wooded lot. By walking together and discussing the project with the homeowners, we were able to match up their goals along with tree preservation that makes good sense. Proud to say that we saved over thirty one trees out there! A mix of big pine and hardwood trees will remain, including one of the largest pines on the property at over 32” in diameter! 

August 19, 2020Pete with tree background

The past few weeks we have had some caterpillars eating leaves on oak trees around town. These pests typically cause no lasting harm to the trees, as minor defoliation this late in the season means the tree's leaves have done the bulk of their job and are almost ready for fall. In some cases, particularly with young and small trees, total defoliation may indicate a need for treatment. We have successfully treated and saved a small number of oak trees in Davidson where it was necessary.  You can read more about caterpillars here: https://content.ces.ncsu.edu/orangestriped-oakworm

Trey's tree update 2020 08 05August 5, 2020

This past week I worked with a variety of folks from the development community to look at a tree preservation effort led by our own Trey Akers from the Town of Davidson Planning Department.
This large red oak tree is to be saved and protected with a chain link protection fence throughout the construction process. This effort represents an approach consistent with leading industry standards and is a direct result of our improved tree ordinance approved by the Board of Commissioners in 2019. Great news! Great effort all around! Thank you Trey!